Photographing on white and on black

I photographed the recently created “Bird” cuff on a white background and on a black glass background as a test to see what works best for the piece. Both seem OK to my eye… just very different. The black is dramatic, the white seems more contemporary.  If I were to list this in my Etsy shop, I might also photograph it with some props from the garden. A leafy branch or two for instance. Plus I need a photo that shows the out-side of the ends as an alternate view.

The brass sheet was originally photo etched to use as a plate for roll printing onto silver, however, I decided it would work better used directly for jewelry. I am now wearing the cuff to see how the polished surface might change over time. The dark background is a heat patina that developed naturally when I annealed the metal for forming.

bird cuff photo etched
Bird cuff 1
Bird Cuff - Carol Holaday
Bird cuff 1 on black

What I am working on now

Documenting a process. I am slowly working on describing the steps I use in creating original artwork for the photo-etching technique I use to produce pattern on sheet metal.

fern photo 5
color photo of fern

I find that starting with my own photos gives me a way to create unique patterns that express my interests. These patterns can be applied in many different ways… ending with a great variety of “results” depending on the choices made along the way. Just three of the many possible results are featured in this post as examples. Only three cuffs for now, but I also have ring bands and pendants from the same photo.

Cuff bracelet
Cuff bracelet with fern print
Cuff above was first colored with heat and then a chemical patina was applied.

fern cuff with LOS
Fern Cuff with LOS only
Cuff above has a simple LOS patina only.

Fern Cuff with Guilder's paste
Fern Cuff with Guilder’s paste and LOS
Cuff above was first colored with both gold and silver Gilder’s paste, and then with LOS.

Edit May 5, 2013 – I keep starting and stopping with this “tutorial” project because I am not sure I have anything new, or sufficiently different, to add to what is already available on the subject. Just do a Google search for “how to etch metal at home” and you will be overwhelmed by the results. Or an image search for “etched copper jewelry” and many of the results will take you to instructions. This is a VERY popular technique with lots of variations for every part of the process… start to finish. Plus, how useful would instructions for preparing an image from a photo be for someone who doesn’t have Photoshop for transforming the photos? Will Photoshop Elements work? How about the free photo editing programs? One large tutorial or many smaller ones for each step? Lots to think about. Meanwhile, I think I’ll simply report on what is working for me as a way of sharing.

Image Guidelines for submitting photos to MBMAG

This is a test to see if I can upload and attach PDFs.

As a member of the Monterey Metal Arts Guild (MBMAG) who is participating in the upcoming exhibit at the Pacific Grove Art Center, it is my job to collect photos from the other participating members and then pass these on to the persons in charge of publicity and postcard design.

The Photo Guidelines and instructions for how to insure images meet these guidelines are specifically for MBMAG members who are already signed up to participate. Click on live links below to open PDFs.

Photo Guidelines v-7-17

How to check file size of photos

Digital images for publication in print

link to page on Guild site for more information related to photography

http://www.mbmag.org/docs/resources/resources-for-jewelry-photography-berman.pdf

The photo I took of Dorothy Rick’s silver cuff bracelet is an example of an image that meets the required guidelines for print media.

Dorothy Rick's Cuff Bracelet
Dorothy Rick – Plan C